Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 198578, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/198578
Review Article

“Preventing the Pain” When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care

1Department of General Practice, Monash University, Building 1, 270 Ferntree Gully Road, Notting Hill, VIC 3168, Australia
2Sexual Violence Research Initiative, Gender and Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Private Bag x385, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
3School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia

Received 30 November 2012; Accepted 18 January 2013

Academic Editor: Kate Joyner

Copyright © 2013 Jan Coles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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