Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 105853, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/105853
Research Article

An Evaluation of the Knowledge and Utilization of the Partogragh in Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Care Settings in Calabar, South-South Nigeria

1Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar and University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar and University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar and University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
4Institute of Community Health, University of Houston, Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA

Received 20 March 2014; Revised 27 July 2014; Accepted 28 July 2014; Published 14 September 2014

Academic Editor: Ross Lawrenson

Copyright © 2014 Ita B. Okokon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The challenge to maternal well-being with associated maternal wastages especially in labor has remained unsurmountable across the three tiers of health care delivery in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine and compare the factors that influence utilization of the partograph in primary, secondary, and tertiary health care delivery levels in Calabar, Nigeria. This was a descriptive study, using a self-administered semistructured questionnaire on 290 consenting nonphysician obstetric care workers, purposively recruited. The mean age of the respondents was with a preponderance of females (92.4%). Knowledge of the partograph and previous partograph training had statistically significant relationship with its utilization among respondents from the tertiary and general hospitals. The level of knowledge was higher among workers in the general hospital than those working in the university teaching hospital. Nurses/midwives in the three levels of care were significantly more knowledgeable in partograph use than other nonphysician obstetric care workers. Lack of detailed knowledge of the partograph, its nonavailability and poor staff strength in the study centers were factors militating against its ease of utilization. The authors recommend periodic in-service training and provision of partograph in labor rooms in all maternity wards in our environment.