Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 106102, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/106102
Research Article

Low Back Pain in Primary Care: A Description of 1250 Patients with Low Back Pain in Danish General and Chiropractic Practice

1Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark
2Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense, Denmark
3Audit Project Odense, Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
4Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark

Received 14 August 2014; Accepted 11 October 2014; Published 4 November 2014

Academic Editor: Carolyn Chew-Graham

Copyright © 2014 Lise Hestbaek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson’s chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out of five patients had had previous episodes, one-fourth were on sick leave, and the LBP considerably limited daily activities. The general practice patients were slightly older and less educated, more often females, and generally worse on all disease-related parameters than chiropractic patients. All differences were statistically significant. Conclusions. LBP in primary care was recurrent, causing sick leave and activity limitations. There were clear differences between the chiropractic and general practice populations in this study.