Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 479596, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/479596
Research Article

Adherence to Long-Term Therapies and Beliefs about Medications

Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia

Received 29 October 2013; Revised 15 December 2013; Accepted 29 December 2013; Published 13 February 2014

Academic Editor: Jens Søndergaard

Copyright © 2014 Abdullah AlHewiti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To assess adherence to long-term medications among patients in family medicine clinics and to evaluate relationship between adherence, beliefs about medications, medication information adequacy, and other factors. Methods. Interviewer assisted survey was conducted to assess adherence using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), beliefs about medications using beliefs about medicine questionnaire (BMQ), and the patients’ perception of medication information adequacy. Results. Of the 408 participants, 56.9% reported low adherence. Pearson’s bivariate correlation showed positive association between MMAS-8 score and BMQ-specific necessity (    ) and the perceived information adequacy (    ), and there was negative association between adherence score and BMQ specific concerns, general overuse, and harm ( , 0.466, and 0.663, resp.) ( ). Multivariable analysis revealed that age, number of medications, number of medical conditions, specific necessity and concerns beliefs, general harm beliefs, and perceived adequacy of medication information were independent predictor of adherence. Furthermore, specific beliefs explain 27.7% of the variance in adherence, while medication information adequacy explains 32.3% of the variance in adherence. Conclusion. The prevalence of low adherence among patients on long-term medications is high and it is related to negative beliefs about medications and to inadequate information given to patients about their medications.