Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2639624, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2639624
Research Article

Trajectories of Change in Obesity among Tehranian Families: Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Modeling

1Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 65175-4171, Hamadan, Iran
2Modelling of Noncommunicable Disease Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 65175-4171, Hamadan, Iran
3Research Center for Health Sciences and Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 65175-4171, Hamadan, Iran
4Cellular Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 19195-4763, Tehran, Iran
5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA

Received 11 October 2015; Revised 10 February 2016; Accepted 15 February 2016

Academic Editor: Samuel Y. S. Wong

Copyright © 2016 Mahdi Akbarzadeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the trajectories of change in obesity within and between Tehranian families, who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). Methods. This study is a family-based longitudinal design, in four waves. A total of 14761 individuals, within 3980 families, were selected. Three anthropometric measurements, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and a body shape index (ABSI), were recorded. Multilevel latent growth curve modeling (MLGCM) approach was used for evaluating the change trajectories in obesity within and between the families. Results. The mean age of the subjects in the present study was (range 3–89 years) and 50.1% were male. Obesity was significantly increased (). Individuals with more fat become obese slower, whereas families with more fat become obese faster (). The initial value and growth rate of WC and ABSI were greater in men than in women, while this result is contrary to BMI (). Conclusions. Our findings demonstrated that there is an alarming increase in the obesity trend in Tehranian families. The important role of the family in the prevention of obesity is highlighted, underlining the need for public health programs, as family centered educations to lifestyle modification, which can address this emerging crisis.