Table of Contents
International Journal of Inorganic Chemistry
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 843051, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/843051
Research Article

A Selective Chemosensor for Mercuric Ions Based on 4-Aminothiophenol-Ruthenium(II) Bis(bipyridine) Complex

1Department of Chemistry, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163, Jordan
2Department of Chemistry, JUST University, Irbid 22110, Jordan

Received 28 November 2010; Revised 22 February 2011; Accepted 23 February 2011

Academic Editor: W. T. Wong

Copyright © 2011 Amer A. G. Al Abdel Hamid et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. F. Monnet-Tschudi, M. G. Zurich, C. Boschat, A. Corbaz, and P. Honegger, “Involvement of environmental mercury and lead in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases,” Reviews on Environmental Health, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 105–117, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. J. Mutter and J. Naumann, “Blood mercury levels and neurobehavior,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 294, no. 6, p. 679, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. Watts, “Mercury poisoning victims could increase by 20,000,” The Lancet, vol. 358, no. 9290, p. 1349, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. E. Palomares, R. Vilar, and J. R. Durrant, “Heterogeneous colorimetric sensor for mercuric salts,” Chemical Communications, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 362–363, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. L. F. Capitán-Vallvey, C. Cano Raya, E. López López, and M. D. Fernández Ramos, “Irreversible optical test strip for mercury determination based on neutral ionophore,” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 524, no. 1-2, pp. 365–372, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. S. S. M. Hassan, W. H. Mahmoud, A. H. K. Mohamed, and A. E. Kelany, “Mercury(II) ion-selective polymeric membrane sensors for analysis of mercury in hazardous wastes,” Analytical Sciences, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 877–881, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. C. Cano-Raya, M. D. Fernández-Ramos, J. Gómez-Sánchez, and L. F. Capitán-Vallvey, “Irreversible optical sensor for mercury determination based on tetraarylborate decomposition,” Sensors and Actuators, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 135–142, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. E. Coronado, J. R. Galán-Mascarós, C. Martí-Gastaldo et al., “Reversible colorimetric probes for mercury sensing,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 127, no. 35, pp. 12351–12356, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. Wang, X. Qian, and J. Cui, “Detecting Hg2+ ions with an ICT fluorescent sensor molecule: remarkable emission spectra shift and unique selectivity,” Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 71, no. 11, pp. 4308–4311, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. Y. Tang, F. He, M. Yu et al., “A reversible and highly selective fluorescent sensor for mercury(II) using poly(thiophene)s that contain thymine moieties,” Macromolecular Rapid Communications, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 389–392, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Ou, Z. Lin, C. Duan, H. Zhang, and Z. Bai, “A sugar-quinoline fluorescent chemosensor for selective detection of Hg2+ ion in natural water,” Chemical Communications, no. 42, pp. 4392–4394, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y. Yu, L.-R. Lin, K.-B. Yang, X. Zhong, R.-B. Huang, and L.-S. Zheng, “p-Dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone: a simple novel selective and sensitive fluorescent sensor for mercury(II) in aqueous solution,” Talanta, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 103–106, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. S. M. Cheung and W. H. Chan, “Hg2+ sensing in aqueous solutions: an intramolecular charge transfer emission quenching fluorescent chemosensors,” Tetrahedron, vol. 62, no. 35, pp. 8379–8383, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. Wang and X. Qian, “A series of polyamide receptor based PET fluorescent sensor molecules: positively cooperative Hg2+ ion binding with high sensitivity,” Organic Letters, vol. 8, no. 17, pp. 3721–3724, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. E. M. Nolan, M. E. Racine, and S. J. Lippard, “Selective Hg(II) detection in aqueous solution with thiol derivatized fluoresceins,” Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 45, no. 6, pp. 2742–2749, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Y. Zhao and Z. Zhong, “Detection of Hg2+ in aqueous solutions with a foldamer-based fluorescent sensor modulated by surfactant micelles,” Organic Letters, vol. 8, no. 21, pp. 4715–4717, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. E. M. Nolan and S. J. Lippard, “A ‘turn-on’ fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of mercuric ion in aqueous media,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 125, no. 47, pp. 14270–14271, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Ono and H. Togashi, “Highly selective oligonucleotide-based sensor for mercury(II) in aqueous solutions,” Angewandte Chemie—International Edition, vol. 43, no. 33, pp. 4300–4302, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. V. Mello and N. S. Finney, “Reversing the discovery paradigm: a new approach to the combinatorial discovery of fluorescent chemosensors,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 127, no. 29, pp. 10124–10125, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. B. Valeur, Molecular Fluorescence: Principles and Applications, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2002.
  21. A. P. de Silva, H. Q. Gunaratne, T. Gunnlaugsson et al., “Signaling recognition events with fluorescent sensors and switches,” Chemical Reviews, vol. 97, no. 5, pp. 1515–1566, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. L. Fabbrizzi and A. Poggi, “Sensors and switches from supramolecular chemistry,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 197–202, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. W. Czarnik, “Chemical communication in water using fluorescent chemosensors,” Accounts of Chemical Research, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 302–308, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. S.-Y. Moon, N. J. Youn, S. M. Park, and S.-K. Chang, “Diametrically disubstituted cyclam derivative having Hg2+-selective fluoroionophoric behaviors,” Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 2394–2397, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. Q.-Y. Chen and C.-F. Chen, “A new Hg2+-selective fluorescent sensor based on a dansyl amide-armed calix[4]-aza-crown,” Tetrahedron Letters, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 165–168, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. X. G. Guo, X. Qian, and L. Jia, “A highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for Hg2+ in neutral buffer aqueous solution,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 126, no. 8, pp. 2272–2273, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. J. Y. Kwon, J. H. Soh, Y. J. Yoon, and J. Yoon, “Highly effective fluorescent sensor for Hg2+ in aqueous solution,” Supramolecular Chemistry, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 621–624, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. V. Ros-Lis, R. Martínez-Máñez, K. Rurack, F. Sancenón, J. Soto, and M. Spieles, “Highly selective chromogenic signaling of Hg2+ in aqueous media at nanomolar levels employing a squaraine-based reporter,” Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 43, no. 17, pp. 5183–5185, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. A. B. Descalzo, R. Martínez-Máñez, R. Radeglia, K. Rurack, and J. Soto, “Coupling selectivity with sensitivity in an integrated chemosensor framework: design of a Hg2+-responsive probe, operating above 500 nm,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 125, no. 12, pp. 3418–3419, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. M. J. Choi, M. Y. Kim, and S. K. Chang, “A new Hg2+-selective chromoionophore based on calix[4]arenediazacrown ether,” Chemical Communications, no. 17, pp. 1664–1665, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. L. Prodi, C. Bargossi, M. Montalti et al., “An effective fluorescent chemosensor for mercury ions,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 122, no. 28, pp. 6769–6770, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. K. Rurack, M. Kollmannsberger, U. Resch-Genger, and J. Daub, “A selective and sensitive fluoroionophore for Hg(II), Ag(I), and Cu(II) with virtually decoupled fluorophore and receptor units,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 122, no. 5, pp. 968–969, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. H. Sakamoto, J. Ishikawa, S. Nakao, and H. Wada, “Excellent mercury(II) ion selective fluoroionophore based on a 3,6,12,15-tetrathia-9-azaheptadecane derivative bearing a nitrobenzoxadiazolyl moiety,” Chemical Communications, no. 23, pp. 2395–2396, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. J. H. Huang, W. H. Wen, Y. Y. Sun, P. T. Chou, and J. M. Fang, “Two-stage sensing property via a conjugated donor-acceptor-donor constitution: application to the visual detection of mercuric ion,” Journal of Organic Chemistry, vol. 70, no. 15, pp. 5827–5832, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. M. Y. Chae and A. W. Czarnik, “Fluorometric chemodosimetry. Mercury(II) and silver(I) indication in water via enhanced fluorescence signaling,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 114, no. 24, pp. 9704–9705, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. V. Dujols, F. Ford, and A. W. Czarnik, “A long-wavelength fluorescent chemodosimeter selective for Cu(II) ion in water,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 119, no. 31, pp. 7386–7387, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. J. V. Ros-Lis, M. D. Marcos, R. Mártinez-Máñez, K. Rurack, and J. Soto, “A regenerative chemodosimeter based on metal-induced dye formation for the highly selective and sensitive optical determination of Hg2+ ions,” Angewandte Chemie—International Edition, vol. 44, no. 28, pp. 4405–4407, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. G. Hennrich, H. Sonnenschein, and U. Resch-Genger, “Redox switchable fluorescent probe selective for either Hg(II) or Cd(II) and Zn(II),” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 121, no. 21, pp. 5073–5074, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. G. Zhang, D. Zhang, S. Yin, X. Yang, Z. Shuai, and D. Zhu, “1,3-Dithiole-2-thione derivatives featuring an anthracene unit: new selective chemodosimeters for Hg(II) ion,” Chemical Communications, no. 16, pp. 2161–2163, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. B. Liu and H. Tian, “A selective fluorescent ratiometric chemodosimeter for mercury ion,” Chemical Communications, no. 25, pp. 3156–3158, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. C.-Y. Li, X.-B. Zhang, Z. Jin, R. Han, G.-L. Shen, and R.-Q. Yu, “A fluorescent chemosensor for cobalt ions based on a multi-substituted phenol-ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) complex,” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 580, no. 2, pp. 143–148, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. M. E. Padilla-Tosta, J. M. Lloris, R. Martínez-Máñez et al., “Bis(terpyridyl)-ruthenium(II) units attached to polyazacycloalkanes as sensing fluorescent receptors for transition metal ions,” European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, no. 4, pp. 741–748, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. M. D. Pratt and P. D. Beer, “Heterodinuclear ruthenium(II) bipyridyl-transition metal dithiocarbamate macrocycles for anion recognition and sensing,” Tetrahedron, vol. 60, no. 49, pp. 11227–11238, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. L. Sun, L. Hammarström, B. Åkermark, and S. Styring, “Towards artificial photosynthesis: ruthenium–manganese chemistry for energy production,” Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 30, pp. 36–49, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  45. M. Sjödin, S. Styring, H. Wolpher, Y. Xu, L. Sun, and L. Hammarström, “Switching the redox mechanism: models for proton-coupled electron transfer from tyrosine and tryptophan,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 127, no. 11, pp. 3855–3863, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. V. Balzani, A. Juris, and M. Venturi, “Luminescent and redox-active polynuclear transition metal complexes,” Chemical Reviews, vol. 96, no. 2, pp. 759–833, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. C. Kaes, A. Katz, and M. W. Hosseini, “Bipyridine: the most widely used ligand. A review of molecules comprising at least two 2,2'-bipyridine units,” Chemical Reviews, vol. 100, no. 10, pp. 3553–3590, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. B. P. Sullivan, D. J. Salmon, and T. J. Meyer, “Mixed phosphine 2,2'-bipyridine complexes of ruthenium,” Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 3334–3341, 1978. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. K. N. Solomon, Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy, Holden-Day, 2nd edition, 1977.
  50. Updates on water contaminants, www.epa.gov/safewater/hfacts.html.