Table of Contents
International Journal of Mineralogy
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 217916, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/217916
Research Article

A New Approach for Provenance Studies of Archaeological Finds: Inferences from Trace Elements in Carbonate Minerals of Alpine White Marbles by a Bench-to-Top μ-XRF Spectrometer

1CNR-IGG Via Valperga Caluso, 35 I-10123 Torino, Italy
2Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Via Valperga Caluso, 35 I-10123 Torino, Italy

Received 4 October 2013; Accepted 15 December 2013; Published 6 February 2014

Academic Editor: Basilios Tsikouras

Copyright © 2014 Gloria Vaggelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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