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International Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 367815, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/367815
Research Article

Room Temperature Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of New Sulfonamides Containing N,N-Diethyl-Substituted Amido Moieties

1Department of Chemistry, Covenant University, Canaanland, P.M.B. 1023, Ogun State, Ota, Nigeria
2Department of Chemistry, University of Lagos, Lagos State, Akoka 100001, Nigeria
3New Functional Polymeric Material Group, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190, China
4Test Center of Antimicrobial Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190, China

Received 26 July 2012; Accepted 5 September 2012

Academic Editor: Patrick Bednarski

Copyright © 2012 Olayinka O. Ajani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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