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International Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 2012, Article ID 498901, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/498901
Review Article

2 , 6 -Dimethylphenylalanine : A Useful Aromatic Amino Acid Surrogate for Tyr or Phe Residue in Opioid Peptides

Department of Biochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8558, Japan

Received 31 January 2012; Revised 15 March 2012; Accepted 18 March 2012

Academic Editor: Yoshio Okada

Copyright © 2012 Yusuke Sasaki and Akihiro Ambo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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