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International Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 2014, Article ID 237286, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/237286
Research Article

Development of Small Molecular Proteasome Inhibitors Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Screen

1 Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ 08628, USA
2 Department of Chemistry, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ 08628, USA

Received 30 May 2014; Revised 6 October 2014; Accepted 8 October 2014; Published 11 November 2014

Academic Editor: Maria Cristina Breschi

Copyright © 2014 Sudhir Nayak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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