Table of Contents
International Journal of Medical Genetics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 478972, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/478972
Review Article

Genetic Markers of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Emphasis on Insulin Resistance

Department of Molecular Endocrinology, National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health (ICMR), J. M. Street, Parel, Mumbai 400012, India

Received 25 April 2014; Accepted 18 July 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: George N. Goulielmos

Copyright © 2014 Nuzhat Shaikh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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