Table of Contents
International Journal of Molecular Imaging
Volume 2012, Article ID 578504, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/578504
Clinical Study

Differential Short-Term Repeated Forearm Hyperaemic Reactivity in Coronary Artery Disease Patients Compared to Healthy Low Risk Participants

1Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, A University of Montreal Affiliated Hospital, 5400 Gouin O., Montréal, QC, Canada H4J 1C5
2Montreal Heart Institute, A University of Montreal Affiliated Hospital, 5000 Bélanger East, Montréal, QC, Canada H1T 1C8
3Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke St West, Montréal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6
4Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, A University of Montreal Affiliated Hospital, 5400 Gouin O., Montréal, QC, Canada H4J 1C5
5Department of Psychology, University of Québec at Montréal (UQAM), P.O. Box 8888, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3P8

Received 6 July 2012; Revised 28 September 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012

Academic Editor: H. Sinzinger

Copyright © 2012 Simon L. Bacon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The hyperaemic response of the forearm is a widely used technique to assess the vascular reactivity. Little is known about the short-term reproducibility and the possible exhaustion of this response in normal or diseased states. As such, the current study was conducted to assess this phenomenon using a unique nuclear medicine- (NM-) based technique. 19 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing NM exercise stress tests and 15 low risk (LR) participants completed 2 reactive hyperaemia tests, using a SPECT-based technique, separated by 15  min. Analyses revealed that CAD patients had lower hyperaemic responses than LR participants ( ), and that there was a significant group × time interaction ( ), such that LR participants showed a larger decrease in the reactivity ( to ) than the CAD patients ( to ). These results suggest that there is a variability, due to disease states, in the reproducibility of the hypaeremic reactivity. This needs to be taken into account in short-term repeated measure studies.