Table of Contents
International Journal of Peptides
Volume 2012, Article ID 634769, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/634769
Review Article

Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

1Department of Oral Pathology, Medicine and Radiology, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis 1121 West Michigan Street, DS290, Indianapolis, IN 46268, USA
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and School of Informatics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA

Received 29 December 2011; Accepted 15 February 2012

Academic Editor: Jean-Marie Zajac

Copyright © 2012 Mythily Srinivasan and A. Keith Dunker. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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