Table of Contents
International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2008, Article ID 256597, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/256597
Review Article

Recent Advances in Medicago truncatula Genomics

1Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
2Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
3Department of Genetics and Biochemistry, Clemson University, 100 Jordan Hall, Clemson, SC 29634, USA

Received 2 April 2007; Accepted 14 September 2007

Academic Editor: Yunbi Xu

Copyright © 2008 Jean-Michel Ané et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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