Table of Contents
International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2008, Article ID 391259, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/391259
Research Article

Conserved Microsynteny of NPR1 with Genes Encoding a Signal Calmodulin-Binding Protein and a CK1-Class Protein Kinase in Beta vulgaris and Two Other Eudicots

Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Building 004, Room 120, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA

Received 8 January 2008; Accepted 19 August 2008

Academic Editor: Silvana Grandillo

Copyright © 2008 David Kuykendall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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