Table of Contents
International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 518687, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/518687
Research Article

Mapping Heat Health Risks in Urban Areas

Monash Weather and Climate, School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton 3800, VIC, Australia

Received 23 March 2012; Accepted 8 August 2012

Academic Editor: Shirlena Huang

Copyright © 2012 Margaret Loughnan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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