Table of Contents
International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 486210, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/486210
Research Article

Changes in Fertility Decline in Rwanda: A Decomposition Analysis

1Applied Statistics Department, University of Rwanda, University Avenue 1, B.P 117, Butare, Rwanda
2Department of Human Geography and Planning, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.115, NL3508TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
3International Development Studies Department, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.115, NL3508TC Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 30 September 2013; Revised 4 December 2013; Accepted 8 December 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Sidney R. Schuler

Copyright © 2014 Pierre Claver Rutayisire et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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