Table of Contents
International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 978186, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/978186
Research Article

Accuracy of Nearly Extinct Cohort Methods for Estimating Very Elderly Subnational Populations

1Queensland Centre for Population Research, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
2Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia

Received 4 February 2015; Accepted 28 May 2015

Academic Editor: Jonathan Haughton

Copyright © 2015 Wilma Terblanche and Tom Wilson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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