Table of Contents
International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 6381842, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6381842
Research Article

Factors Influencing Contraceptives Use among Women in the Juba City of South Sudan

1Virtual University of Uganda, Kampala, Uganda
2School of Business & Law, Department of Administration & Management Studies, University for Development Studies, Wa, Ghana
3Department of Community Health, St. Francis University College of Health and Allied Sciences, Ifakara, Tanzania

Correspondence should be addressed to Albino Kalolo; moc.liamg@aololak

Received 16 November 2017; Accepted 3 January 2018; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Sally Guttmacher

Copyright © 2018 Justin Geno Obwoya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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