Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 329467, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/329467
Review Article

Secretome Analysis of Skeletal Myogenesis Using SILAC and Shotgun Proteomics

1Department of Biology, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
2Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry (CRMS), York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
3Muscle Health Research Centre (MHRC), York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
4Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions (CRBI), York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
5Department of Chemistry, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Received 15 November 2010; Accepted 26 January 2011

Academic Editor: Uwe Völker

Copyright © 2011 C. Y. X'avia Chan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Myogenesis, the formation of skeletal muscle, is a multistep event that commences with myoblast proliferation, followed by cell-cycle arrest, and finally the formation of multinucleated myotubes via fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. Each step is orchestrated by well-documented intracellular factors, such as cytoplasmic signalling molecules and nuclear transcription factors. Regardless, the key step in getting a more comprehensive understanding of the regulation of myogenesis is to explore the extracellular factors that are capable of eliciting the downstream intracellular factors. This could further provide valuable insight into the acute cellular response to extrinsic cues in maintaining normal muscle development. In this paper, we survey the intracellular factors that respond to extracellular cues that are responsible for the cascades of events during myogenesis: myoblast proliferation, cell-cycle arrest of myoblasts, and differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. This focus on extracellular perspective of muscle development illustrates our mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches to identify differentially expressed secreted factors during skeletal myogenesis.