Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2011, Article ID 373584, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/373584
Review Article

The Role of Proteomics in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Women's Cancers: Current Trends in Technology and Future Opportunities

1Department of Systems Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77054, USA
2Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola university of Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL 60153, USA
3Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola university of Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL 60153, USA
4Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Georgia, 240 W Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 11 February 2011; Accepted 7 April 2011

Academic Editor: Melissa Muller

Copyright © 2011 Eun-Kyoung Yim Breuer and Mandi M. Murph. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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