Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2015, Article ID 659241, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/659241
Research Article

Comparative Proteomic Study Reveals the Molecular Aspects of Delayed Ocular Symptoms Induced by Sulfur Mustard

1Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran, Iran
2Department of Ophthalmology, Chemical Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Received 14 July 2014; Accepted 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: Christian Huck

Copyright © 2015 Zaiddodine Pashandi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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