Table of Contents
International Journal of Vehicular Technology
Volume 2013, Article ID 924170, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/924170
Review Article

Development and Evaluation of Automotive Speech Interfaces: Useful Information from the Human Factors and the Related Literature

1Driver Interface Group, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2150, USA
2Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA

Received 11 October 2012; Revised 10 January 2013; Accepted 17 January 2013

Academic Editor: Motoyuki Akamatsu

Copyright © 2013 Victor Ei-Wen Lo and Paul A. Green. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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