Table of Contents
Journal of Insects
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 591705, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/591705
Research Article

Measuring Intraspecific Variation in Flight-Related Morphology of Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus): Which Sex Has the Best Flying Gear?

Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 11 August 2015; Accepted 12 October 2015

Academic Editor: Yuxian Xia

Copyright © 2015 Andrew K. Davis and Michael T. Holden. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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