Table of Contents
Influenza Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 286158, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/286158
Research Article

Comparative Serological Assays for the Study of H5 and H7 Avian Influenza Viruses

1Viral Pseudotype Unit, Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
2FAO-OIE and National Reference Laboratory for Newcastle Disease and Avian Influenza, Istituto Zooprofilattico delle Venezie, Viale dell’Università 10, 35020 Legnaro, Italy

Received 28 June 2013; Accepted 16 August 2013

Academic Editor: Prasert Auewarakul

Copyright © 2013 Eleonora Molesti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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