Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2011, Article ID 192414, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/192414
Research Article

Is MS Intention Tremor Amplitude Related to Changed Peripheral Reflexes?

1Departments of Biomedical Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2REVAL, PHL University College Hasselt and BIOMED, University of Hasselt, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
3National MS Center Melsbroek, 1820 Melsbroek, Belgium

Received 7 July 2011; Accepted 26 July 2011

Academic Editors: A. Arboix and A. Mamelak

Copyright © 2011 Peter Feys et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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