Table of Contents
ISRN Pediatrics
Volume 2011, Article ID 258640, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/258640
Review Article

How Pediatricians Can Deal with Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused by Family Members

Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel

Received 6 September 2011; Accepted 3 October 2011

Academic Editors: V. M. Di Ciommo, Y. Finkelstein, and K. Tokiwa

Copyright © 2011 Ruth Wolf. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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