Table of Contents
ISRN Nursing
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 270464, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/270464
Research Article

Obesity and Overweight Prevalence among a Mississippi Low-Income Preschool Population: A Five-Year Comparison

1School of Nursing, College of Health, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, Box 5095, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, USA
2School of Social Work, College of Health, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, Box 5114, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, USA
3Department of Nutrition and Food Systems, College of Health, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, Box 5172, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, USA
4School of Human Performance and Recreation, College of Health, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, Box 5142, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, USA
5Office of Health Data and Research, Mississippi State Department of Health , 570 E. Woodrow Wilson, Jackson, MS 39215-1700, USA

Received 30 June 2011; Accepted 21 July 2011

Academic Editors: K.-C. Lin and A. Williams

Copyright © 2011 Bonnie L. Harbaugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. This study determined 2010 rates of overweight/obesity in a representative sample of low-income preschoolers in Mississippi, USA and compared rates between 2005 ( 𝑁 = 1 2 5 0 ) and 2010 ( 𝑁 = 1 7 6 5 ). Significance. Obesity is a significant global health issue because of its well-established negative health consequences. Child obesity is a concern due to risk of early-onset obesity-related illnesses and the longevity of lifetime exposure to those illnesses. Methods. Identical measures were used in 2005 and 2010 with complex-stratified sampling designs. Results. Chi-square tests revealed that overall obesity/overweight rates between 2005 (20.6%/17.9%) and 2010 (20.8%/17.0%) had not changed significantly for the samples as a whole, nor by gender or race. Age group comparisons indicated a significant decline in obesity rates of 3 year olds (20.3% in 2005, reduced to 13.1% in 2010, 𝑃 = 0 . 0 3 5 ). These findings mimic the trend toward stabilization of obesity rates noted in national low-income preschool populations.