Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 329692, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/329692
Research Article

Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Lead on Estrogen Action in the Prepubertal Rat Uterus

Laboratory of Experimental Endocrinology and Environmental Pathology (LEEPA), Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICBM), University of Chile Medical School, P.O. Box 21104, Santiago 21, Chile

Received 9 August 2011; Accepted 21 September 2011

Academic Editors: I. Diez-Itza and L. Schuler-Faccini

Copyright © 2011 Andrei N. Tchernitchin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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