Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 369573, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/369573
Review Article

Risks and Precautions of Genetically Modified Organisms

1Institute of Microbial Technology (CSIR), Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160036, India
2Department of Biotechnology, UIET, Punjab University, Chandigarh, India
3Department of Biotechnology, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur 495009, India

Received 9 August 2011; Accepted 18 September 2011

Academic Editor: L. Chícharo

Copyright © 2011 Dhan Prakash et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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