Table of Contents
ISRN Gastroenterology
Volume 2011, Article ID 402583, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/402583
Research Article

Anorectal Motility and Sensation Abnormalities and Its Correlation with Anorectal Symptoms in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Preliminary Study

1Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-0655, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-0655, USA
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-0655, USA

Received 8 March 2011; Accepted 19 April 2011

Academic Editor: A. Nakajima

Copyright Β© 2011 Hanaa S. Sallam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Gastrointestinal (GI) hypomotility and symptoms are common in Scleroderma (SSc) patients yet so far uncorrelated. Eight SSc patients and matched controls were queried about their GI dysmotility symptoms and quality of life (QoL) and underwent anorectal motility and sensory tests. Specific scoring systems were developed for anorectal symptoms and anorectal dysmotility. We found that (1) the SSc patients showed low QoL and marked overall GI symptoms. The most common anorectal symptom was incomplete bowel movement (50%). (2) Compared to normal controls, SSc patients showed impaired anorectal pressures, sensations, and rectal compliance ( 𝑃 ≀ . 0 1 for each). (3) The anorectal motility/sensation abnormality score was robustly correlated with the total anorectal symptom score ( π‘Ÿ 𝑠 = . 7 8 , 𝑃 = . 0 2 ). In conclusion, scleroderma patients have impaired anorectal motor and sensory functions, and the abnormality score of these anorectal functions is correlated with the total anorectal symptoms score. These scoring systems may assist clinicians in predicting dysmotility based on patient symptoms.