Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 461310, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/461310
Research Article

Determination of Alterations in Forest Condition Using Various Measures of Land Use Change along an Urban-Rural Gradient in the West Georgia Piedmont, USA

1School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, USA
2School of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Box 352100, Seattle, WA 98195-2100, USA

Received 3 February 2011; Accepted 14 March 2011

Academic Editor: G. Moreno

Copyright © 2011 Diane M. Styers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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