Table of Contents
ISRN Ophthalmology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 465198, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/465198
Clinical Study

Meibomian Gland Dysfunction: Endocrine Aspects

1Department of Ophthalmology, College of Health Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey
2Department of Statistics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey
3Department of Biochemistry, College of Health Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey

Received 15 July 2011; Accepted 21 August 2011

Academic Editor: J. Wang

Copyright © 2011 Ozlem G. Sahin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples 𝑡 -test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction.