Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 465483, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/465483
Research Article

Multiple Pregnancy after Gonadotropin-Intrauterine Insemination: An Unavoidable Event?

1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB E506, Newark, NJ 07103, USA
2Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, 650 First Avenue Room 556/558, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 15 October 2011; Accepted 20 November 2011

Academic Editor: M. Kühnert

Copyright © 2011 Shirley A. Fong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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