Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 476158, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/476158
Review Article

Inflammatory Animal Model for Parkinson's Disease: The Intranigral Injection of LPS Induced the Inflammatory Process along with the Selective Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons

1Departmento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
2Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío/CSIC, Universidad de Sevilla, 41013 Sevilla, Spain

Received 25 February 2011; Accepted 17 March 2011

Academic Editors: A. Conti and A. Lewén

Copyright © 2011 A. Machado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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