Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 480195, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/480195
Research Article

A Perspective on the Consequences for Insect Herbivores and Their Natural Enemies When They Share Plant Resources

1Bio-Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University, P.O. Box 84, Liacoln 7647, Canterbury, New Zealand
2Département Protection des Végétaux Grandes Cultures et Vigne/Viticulture et Oenologie, Group Entomologie, Station de Recherche Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW, CP 1012 1260 Nyon, Switzerland

Received 1 February 2011; Accepted 13 March 2011

Academic Editor: A. Chappelka

Copyright © 2011 Patrik Kehrli and Steve D. Wratten. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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