Table of Contents
ISRN Endocrinology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 481371, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/481371
Research Article

Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Hispanic Parents of Children with Acanthosis Nigricans

1Department of Management, Policy, and Community Health, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
3Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Permian Basin Campus, 701 W 5th Street, Odessa, TX 79763, USA
4Cook Children's Physician Network, Fort Worth, TX 76104, USA
5Department of Behavioral and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
6Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

Received 18 October 2011; Accepted 13 November 2011

Academic Editors: C. Bizzarri and J. Vrbikova

Copyright Β© 2011 Ximena Urrutia-Rojas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Assess the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism among Hispanic parents of children with acanthosis nigricans (AN). Methods. Hispanic families ( 𝑛 = 2 5 8 ) were evaluated for metabolic and anthropometric parameters including fasting glucose levels and AN status. Results. Mothers with AN+ children had IFG (17.3%) and 4% had glucose levels ≥126 mg/dL ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 2 8 ) compared to 7.1% and 1.8% of mothers with AN− children, respectively. Mothers of AN+ children also had greater odds of having impaired fasting glucose levels (OR: 3.917, 95% CI: 1.475–10.404; 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 4 ) but this was not the case for fathers (OR: 1.125, 95% CI: 0.489–2.586; 𝑃 = 0 . 7 8 1 ). Mothers of AN+ children were also more likely to be AN+ (OR: 5.76, 95% CI: 2.98–11.13, 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ). Screening discovered glucose levels >126 mg/dL in 9% of fathers with AN+ children. Conclusions. Hispanic mothers of AN+ children are at higher risk of carbohydrate metabolism abnormalities. AN in children can be a marker for prevention and delay programs aimed at identifying adults at risk for diabetes.