Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2011, Article ID 521847, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/521847
Research Article

Familial Parkinson's Disease Mutant E46K α-Synuclein Localizes to Membranous Structures, Forms Aggregates, and Induces Toxicity in Yeast Models

Biology Department, Lake Forest College, Box P7, 555 North Sheridan Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045, USA

Received 30 March 2011; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editors: H. Miyajima and A. K. Petridis

Copyright © 2011 Michael Fiske et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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