Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 560641, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/560641
Research Article

Awareness of Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness in Southeastern Nigeria

1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar P.M.B 1278, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
2Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar P.M.B 1278, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

Received 11 April 2011; Accepted 18 May 2011

Academic Editor: E. Cosmi

Copyright © 2011 John E. Ekabua et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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