Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2011, Article ID 564972, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/564972
Research Article

Chloroformic and Methanolic Extracts of Olea europaea L. Leaves Present Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities

1Laboratory of Physiology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Monastir, Monastir 5000, Tunisia
2Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Farmacry, University of Monastir, Monastir 5000, Tunisia

Received 30 January 2011; Accepted 3 April 2011

Academic Editors: K. Lutfy, F. Martel, and A. Szallasi

Copyright © 2011 R Chebbi Mahjoub et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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