Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 721872, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/721872
Clinical Study

Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Antibacterial Susceptibility Patterns in an Obstetric Population

1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital, Ankara 06230, Turkey
2Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital, Ankara 06230, Turkey
3Infectious Disease and Clinical Microbiology, Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital, Ankara 06230, Turkey

Received 26 December 2010; Accepted 12 January 2011

Academic Editors: A. Canellada and J. Olsen

Copyright © 2011 Şevki Çelen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), occurring in 2–11% of pregnancies, is a major predisposition to the development of pyelonephritis, which is associated with obstetrical complications, such as preterm labor and low birth weight infants. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ASB, the antibacterial susceptibilities of the isolated microorganisms and the associated risk factors in an outpatient clinical setting in Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Material and Methods. Between December 2009 and May 2010, pregnant women admitted to the antenatal outpatient clinic were included in this study. The results of a complete urine analysis, midstream urine culture and antibacterial susceptibility were evaluated. Results. Of the 2011 pregnant women included, 171 had ASB (8.5%). E. coli was the most frequently isolated microorganism (76.6%), followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (14.6%). Both microorganisms were highly sensitive to fosfomycin, sensivity being 99.2% for E. coli and 88% for Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusions. In this certain geographical region, we found E. coli as the most common causative agent of ASB in the obstetric population and it is very sensitive to fosfomycin. We recommend fosfomycin for ASB in pregnant women due to its high sensitivity, ease of administration and safety for use in pregnancy.