Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 730801, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/730801
Research Article

Potential Effects of Host Height and Phenology on Adult Susceptibility to Foliar Attack in Tropical Dry Forest Grass

Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro No. 8701, Ex Hacienda de San José de la Huerta, 58190 Morelia, MICH, Mexico

Received 31 January 2011; Accepted 29 March 2011

Academic Editors: P. Coley and D. Sánchez-Fernández

Copyright © 2011 Bráulio A. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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