Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 751472, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/751472
Research Article

Recovery of Vegetation Structure and Species Diversity after Shifting Cultivation in Northwestern Vietnam, with Special Reference to Commercially Valuable Tree Species

1Lab of Forest Utilization, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
2Silviculture Research Division, Forest Science Institute of Vietnam, Tu Liem, Ha Noi, Vietnam

Received 1 July 2011; Accepted 19 July 2011

Academic Editors: S. F. Ferrari and D. Yemane Ghebrehiwet

Copyright © 2011 Do Van Tran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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