Table of Contents
ISRN Nursing
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 752320, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/752320
Research Article

Additional Support for Simple Imputation of Missing Quality of Life Data in Nursing Research

1Clinical Research Centre, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 2V7
2Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 2V7
3School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 2V7
4Practice and Research in Nursing (PRN) Group, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 2V7
5Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 2V7

Received 5 August 2011; Accepted 5 September 2011

Academic Editors: V. Lohne and H. S. Shin

Copyright © 2011 Wilma M. Hopman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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