Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmaceutics
Volume 2011, Article ID 805983, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/805983
Research Article

Pharmacogenetics and Gender Association with Psychotic Episodes on Nortriptyline Lower Doses: Patient Cases

1Diversity Health Institute, Western Sydney Local Health District, North Parramatta, NSW 2151, Australia
2DHI Lab, ICPMR Building, Westmead Hospital, Level 2 Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia

Received 6 April 2011; Accepted 20 May 2011

Academic Editors: E. Hassan, G. Lentini, and C. Saturnino

Copyright © 2011 Irina Piatkov and Trudi Jones. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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