Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmaceutics
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 806789, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/806789
Review Article

Human Tissue in the Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of New Medicines: A Viable Alternative to Animal Models?

27 Wodehouse Terrace, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11 3EN, UK

Received 18 April 2011; Accepted 15 May 2011

Academic Editors: K. Arimori and J. Arnold

Copyright © 2011 Robert A. Coleman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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