Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2011, Article ID 838606, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/838606
Review Article

Effects of Heat Stress on the Well-Being, Fertility, and Hatchability of Chickens in the Northern Guinea Savannah Zone of Nigeria: A Review

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria 81001, Nigeria
2National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria 81001, Nigeria

Received 2 March 2011; Accepted 21 March 2011

Academic Editors: B. China and P. Holt

Copyright © 2011 J. O. Ayo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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