Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 847684, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/847684
Review Article

Smoking and Cervical Cancer

Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade da Beira Interior, Avenida Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã, Portugal

Received 24 April 2011; Accepted 25 May 2011

Academic Editors: C. J. Petry and L. C. Zeferino

Copyright © 2011 José Alberto Fonseca-Moutinho. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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