Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2011, Article ID 872358, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/872358
Research Article

Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in Vaginal Swab Clinical Samples from Palestinian Women by Culture

1Master Program in Clinical Laboratory Science, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Palestine
2Central Public Health Laboratory, Palestinian Ministry of Health, Ramallah, West Bank, Palestine

Received 26 September 2011; Accepted 1 November 2011

Academic Editors: M. Canica and M. C. Lai

Copyright © 2011 Yasmeen Houso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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