Table of Contents
ISRN Nursing
Volume 2011, Article ID 893819, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/893819
Review Article

Microchimerism: Sharing Genes in Illness and in Health

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 5515 Security Lane, Rockville, MD 20852, USA

Received 12 January 2011; Accepted 24 February 2011

Academic Editor: A. Green

Copyright © 2011 Maureen A. Knippen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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